Five Crucial Aspects to Address While Repurposing Your Legacy Courses


Modernizing legacy courses is the need of the hour for organizations that have been into the course development business since long. While making the decision to repurpose legacy content, what are some aspects one should consider? It is not about simply converting Flash or old technology courses to HTML5 but meeting the current and future business needs as well. We, at team Harbinger, have been involved with various organizations to help them repurpose their legacy courses.  Based on our experience of working with these organizations, here are top five aspects people look into, while defining their modernization strategy:

1. Impact on Customer Experience

Since some; or all your legacy courses are still part of your course catalog, and learners are subscribing to it, modernizing would have an impact your current customer experience. Learners would need to spend quite some time figuring out aspects like which browser to use, how to enable flash player in a browser, and go back and forth with the support desks hoping to start viewing the course. This means that the number of support tickets at your service desk will be on the rise and there is every possibility that your support teams will be overworked in order to improve the customer satisfaction score.

2. Strategic Alignment of Goals

Aligning the repurposed legacy courses to the business strategy is crucial. For e.g. if your business is dependent on millennial learners, then micro-learning enabled courses would be an important consideration during redesign. If you are looking to comply with federal government laws, then WCAG compliance would be significant, or if you are thinking of white-labeling courses for your customers then having that kind of flexibility at design level would take precedence over other factors.

3. Future-Ready Enhancements

Another important aspect is to ensure that you are thinking ahead of time and making these courses future-ready. Since you are investing so much time and efforts today to fall in-line with the latest technology and trends, it shouldn’t be the case that several years down the line, you are forced to think about making more changes to them, which means, more investment.

Features like metadata tagging, content chunking into logical micro-nuggets, make the content easily reusable and give you the flexibility for easy updates.

4. Resource Management

As leaders of the content development team, you could also be in a dilemma about managing the whole spectrum of your resources for this specific spike in volume. This would be a tricky situation as you might need to ramp up your content development team size for very specific periods to meet the volume demands and the go-to-market strategies.

5. Weighing all pros and cons against the bottom line

Eventually when it is time to take a decision, you will have to weigh the pros and cons on what will be the impact on your bottom line. If you have a huge catalog of courses, instead of a blanket implementation, you could bucket the courses and select a different approach for each bucket. For example, for top performing courses, you could do a complete revamp. For courses which are not being sold or used a lot, may be a simple cost-effective solution with small fixes to ensure they work on latest browsers could do the job.

Do these aspects sound familiar, have they popped up during your strategy meetings too? If you have been working around some of these, we would happy to hear from you and share our thoughts.


Wondering What To Do With Your Legacy Courses?

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It’s that time of the year when we look at the year gone by and put together the charter for the coming year. One of the questions that would have consistently popped up in our minds throughout this year would have been – what should be done with the legacy courses? But, like every year, some other (read ‘more significant’) business need would have taken priority and legacy courses would have gone on the back burner.

In the past few months a couple of announcements are making organizations rethink their decisions and redefine some of their priorities for the upcoming year in terms of handling legacy courses. The first one is the Flash sunset announcement for 2020 and the other one is the United States deadline for conformance to worldwide WCAG 2.0 guidelines. With both these advancements, the only feasible solutions seems to be repurposing legacy courses to make them relevant and appropriate in today’s context.

Here are 5 more reasons on why repurposing needs to be considered sooner than later:

1. The content is still relevant and instructionally sound but with the advent of new devices and browsers, these courses might not just work going forward.
2. The learner profile is changing considerably. Forget about millennials, Gen Z seems to be getting into the workforce as well, and the way these two target audiences would want to learn is different – bite sized, mobile and just-in-time.
3. Repurposing enhances your learners’ user experience and reduces the stress on your support teams and troubleshooting staff.
4. It helps strengthen your course catalog portfolio.
5. It could positively impact your bottom line.

We’ll let these thoughts sink in till we come up with the next blog in this series. In case you would like to have a discussion on this, write to us at .
With this note here’s wishing you a very happy and spirited holiday season.

You need a partner not a vendor



One of the core values that we have at Harbinger is working with our customers as a partner rather than a vendor. All our actions and attributes are directed towards this value and we as a team constantly try and practice them.

Well, you can question, that since at the end of the day everyone is executing projects for their customers and in return is getting compensated for a mutually agreed amount, then how can one differentiate between a vendor and a partner? Well, I will not try to answer this question right away, but instead highlight some values that we as a team bring on the table for our customers. That would definitely bring out the key aspects of being a partner.
So here are the core values which define our working style:

Agility: It is the ability to quickly adapt to specific needs which can help fulfil mission critical objectives for our customers. For instance, agility is displayed in our ability to ramp-up the team size on a short notice to meet a specific go-to-market plan, or our willingness to quickly learn a new technology to give a differentiated solution to a customer.

Accountability: We believe in being accountable throughout, and showing it consistently. For example, if a deliverable has been promised on a certain date, then take the responsibility delivering it on time. Not only do we understand the specifications of a particular project, but we also try to understand the business impact it can have and we hold ourselves accountable to ensure that all desired goals are met.

Transparency: This is a key factor in developing effective relationships as partners. We give a complete and transparent view of various activities to the stakeholders and have constant and open communication to mitigate risks well ahead of time.

Quality: A customer generally finds it annoying to invest time in testing, finding bugs and then sending the final product back for fixes. To avoid this, our dedicated quality assurance team ensures that every deliverable that goes out of the window is tested for the quality standards and there is nothing left for chance.

Culture of learning and innovation: Last but not the least; we thrive on a culture of learning and innovation. It is embedded within all our team members. It helps our customers in tackling the ever changing technology needs. One of our customers had once mentioned ‘It is great that we have a development partner who believes in learning and innovation because we do not get time to learn in our day to day activities.’

These values make us what we are and we are proud of them.

It will be wonderful to hear your thoughts and experiences on the values and attributes through which you have been able to differentiate your suppliers as partners. Share your comments below or write to us at with your thoughts.

7 Things to Keep in Mind While Designing Digital Learning for Millennials

For eLearning course designers, learners have always been the central focus. In the recent times, it has been felt that the way learners learn and consume eLearning has been changing and one of the primary reasons is the emergence of the millennial learner on the stage.

So, who’s the millennial, and what’s so different about their learning style?


Millennials are the digital generation of today (mainly, the people born in the 1980s or 1990s) who are married to technology to an extent that it’s almost an extension of their own selves. Research indicates that they:

  • Are global citizens
  • Have an entrepreneurial spirit
  • Come from diverse backgrounds
  • Have a limited attention span

So how do you align your development strategy to meet the specific learning needs of millennials?

  1. Make it platform and device agnostic: Do not bind the learner to a specific device or environment; make the digital learning available anywhere, anytime. Preferably, adopt a ‘mobile first’ approach.
  1. Keep it short: Keep the eLearning bite-sized and make it available in micro-learning formats to suit the diversified visual, auditory, and kinetic learning needs. A rigid framework might put off the learner.
  2. Learning goal should be visible: Make the end goal visible to the learner to tie the learning to their work life. This will bring in their active participation and will also encourage them to use the learning in real-world scenarios. This serves their need to be practical and result-oriented.
  3. Make it challenging and fun: Millennials would prefer to solve challenges, so create scenarios close to their day-to-day work and throw in some gamification elements to make it a challenging and fun experience at the same time.
  4. Enable the learner: Keep the design fluid, and enable them to be in control, to take risks, and to multitask. For example, teach a sales call through a branching scenario where learners select the choices they will make while talking to a prospective customer that could result into a successful closure or lost opportunity.
  5. Make it social: Bring in the social and collaborative learning components such as discussion forums, chats, badges, etc. Millennials prefer collaborative experiences and tend to share anything they like. This allows them to enhance their learning experience and also helps the learner community.
  6. Keep it diverse: Various research studies show that millennials are the most diverse of the lot. They consider themselves global citizens. Aim to capture this element in your design for an enhanced learning experience. This could be achieved by using ethnically diverse photographs, globally applicable examples, and using “youth speak.”

This is definitely not a secret sauce or the only seven things which need to be considered while creating a digital learning experience for millennials; but something basic, yet important.

I would like to hear both from eLearning designers and millennial learners about their experiences and views on this.

Have you considered digitizing your induction training yet?


Effective induction training is critical to the success and future of new employees within an organization. It’s equally critical for the organization to achieve faster and efficient business results. However, it is not always a cakewalk to organize and impart induction training through conventional classroom methods. HR managers struggle with several challenges associated with it, and digital/eLearning approach is rapidly getting popular as a solution to those challenges. So what are some of the top challenges related to in-person/classroom induction training, and how eLearning can help solve them? Let’s dig a bit deeper.


  • Risk of inconsistent messaging: Classroom training is at the risk of inconsistent messaging which largely depends on trainers’ tone and methods. With deployment of a standardized eLearning program, organizations can ensure that new employees joining across locations get consistent induction experience. In addition, you can also localize the courses to reach out to various geographies.


  • Logistical nightmare: It is challenging for HR teams to gather all new employees and trainers at one place for the required number of days. Also, there are a lot of administrative tasks like travel and stay arrangements of trainers and attendees, arrangements for classrooms and equipment, study material etc. Conversely, eLearning once created can be deployed number of times, across number of locations. Thus, it can help reduce the logistical hassles, and in turn, the associated costs.


  • Information overload: New employees are often overloaded with information during induction training. They can take eLearning anytime (even before joining), anywhere and any number of times. Thus, they can take/revisit the content at their own pace and complete the training independently and confidently.


  • Catering to various staff types: It’s a challenge to make the induction training program flexible enough which can be deployed across various occupational groups such as full-time, part-time, contractors, staff on secondment and temporary staff. eLearning course can be easily tailored to make specific part(s) of the training available to different types of staff.


  • Tracking and ensuring compliance: Keeping a track of induction status of all new employees is a time consuming task. An eLearning course helps to track the completion and compliance in a faster and efficient way. It is easy to ensure that employees revisit the relevant content until they clear the course and complete the relevant courses before taking their role.


  • Maintaining learners’ interest and focus: Some parts of induction training such as company policies and procedures could be heavy for new employees. With the use of compelling multimedia elements, variety of presentation styles and interactions, such topics can be made interesting for new employees. This, in turn, can help them in knowledge retention and transfer.


Let’s consider examples of product manufacturing and healthcare industries to understand how eLearning could benefit them. For product manufacturing companies with multiple product lines, eLearning ensures consistent and up-to-date messaging about various products across all locations. New employees can thus gain comprehensive product knowledge which is accessible to them all the times. Healthcare and life-sciences companies use a variety of data and record maintaining apps. The relevant app training becomes crucial for new employees to use it effectively on-the-job. ELearning can particularly be beneficial here as new employees can learn the apps independently through “Show-me”, “Let-Me Try” simulation courses.


eLearning also helps to make the induction experience fun and engaging for the millennial hires. Millennials are tech-savvy, goal oriented, and like to learn by exploring. Gamification elements such as leaderboards, badges, rewards, achievements, levels and visual progress bars appeal specifically to the millennial hires and inspire them to complete the training with focus and vigor.


Thus, eLearning helps in efficient on boarding of new employees with less time, cost and resources. If required, you can blend it with classroom training, and it could be an ideal deal as you can reap the benefits of both types of training. The blended approach can help create a positive impact on organization’s success, as new employees will come out of the training with more motivation, confidence and readiness to start productive work immediately.